Plum, Red Grape and Almond Smoothie

Post image for Plum, Red Grape and Almond Smoothie

I decided to combine red grapes and plums here because of how well plums and wine go together in desserts. (I wasn’t about to attempt a red wine smoothie, but I hope this recipe inspires some daring mixologists.)

2 1/2 small or 2 large plums, pitted and sliced (about 3/4 cup sliced)

1/2 cup red grapes, rinsed

1 to 2 teaspoons rose geranium syrup

1 tablespoon almond meal

1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/4 cup almond beverage

3 to 4 ice cubes

1. Place all of the ingredients in a blender and blend until frothy, about one minute.

Yield: One serving.

Nutritional information per serving: 177 calories; 0 grams saturated fat; 0 grams polyunsaturated fat; 1 gram monounsaturated fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol; 34 grams carbohydrates; 3 grams dietary fiber; 42 milligrams sodium; 3 grams protein

Martha Rose Shulman is the author of “The Very Best of Recipes for Health.”

Recipe: Fruit Smoothies for Summer

When I go to a farmers’ market in summer, I can’t resist buying more fruit than I need. I blame those cut fruit samples — one taste, and I’m filling my bag.

Fruit from the market is already ripe, and there are times when I need to use up what I have. Smoothies are a great solution; you can blend a lot of fruit into one drink, more than you’d cut up and stir into your morning yogurt.

This week I tried something different. I didn’t use frozen bananas in these recipes, as I usually do for smoothies, and I decided not to use dairy. Some of this week’s offerings are pure fruit and ice, sweetened with a rose geranium-infused syrup or agave nectar. When I needed to bulk up a smoothie or make it creamier, I used almond milk.

Except for one made with dates and figs, you’ll find these smoothies only moderately sweet. In all of them, you can really taste the fruit.

Berry and Rose Geranium Smoothie

Fragrant rose geranium is very easy to grow in pots, and a little goes a long way. I use it to make a syrup that I add to just about anything I make with berries.

1/2 cup blueberries

1/2 cup raspberries

3/4 cup hulled strawberries

2 to 3 tablespoons rose geranium syrup (see below)

4 ice cubes

1. Place all of the ingredients in the blender. Blend until frothy, about one minute. Serve at once.

Yield: One serving.

Rose Geranium Syrup

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup water

2 sprigs rose geranium

Combine the sugar and water, and bring a to a boil. Reduce the heat, and simmer three to five minutes until slightly thick. Add the rose geranium sprigs to the pot, turn off the heat and cover tightly. Allow the rose geranium to steep for 15 minutes. Strain into a jar, and place in the refrigerator. The syrup will keep for about a week.

Yield: A little less than 1 cup.

Nutritional information per serving: 157 calories; 0 grams saturated fat; 1 gram polyunsaturated fat; 0 grams monounsaturated fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol; 39 grams carbohydrates; 8 grams dietary fiber; 3 milligrams sodium; 2 grams protein

Martha Rose Shulman is the author of “The Very Best of Recipes for Health.”

Recipe: Watermelon Mint Smoothie

I’m always tossing watermelon with fresh mint, so I decided to see how the two would blend in a smoothie. The result is like a cross between a sweet mint tea and a watermelon agua fresca.

2 cups, tightly packed, diced seedless watermelon

1 tablespoon fresh mint leaves

1 teaspoon sugar, agave syrup or vanilla sugar

3 to 4 ice cubes (more to taste)

Watermelon balls for garnish

1. Place all of the ingredients except the watermelon balls in the blender. Blend until frothy, about one minute. Pour into a glass, and garnish with watermelon balls. Serve right away.

Yield: One serving.

Nutritional information per serving: 110 calories; 0 grams saturated fat; 0 grams polyunsaturated fat; 0 grams monounsaturated fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol; 28 grams carbohydrates; 1 gram dietary fiber; 6 milligrams sodium; 2 grams protein

Martha Rose Shulman is the author of “The Very Best of Recipes for Health.”

Recipe: Fresh Fig and Date Shake

Many of us who frequent farmers’ markets this time of year bring home far more figs than we need. This thick, date-sweetened smoothie is a great way to get rid of the extras.

4 fresh ripe figs (about 4 ounces)

2 moist, plump Medjool dates (about 1 1/2 ounces)

1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice

4 ice cubes

A few fig slices for the glass

1. Place all of the ingredients except the sliced fig in the blender. Blend until frothy, about one minute. Pour into a glass, garnish with fig slices, and serve at once.

Yield: One serving.

Nutritional information per serving: 285 calories; 0 grams saturated fat; 0 grams polyunsaturated fat; 0 grams monounsaturated fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol; 74 grams carbohydrates; 7 grams dietary fiber; 3 milligrams sodium; 3 grams protein

Martha Rose Shulman is the author of “The Very Best of Recipes for Health.”

Recipe: Peach Vanilla Smoothie

I was thinking peaches and almonds when I began working on this granola-thickened smoothie, but it ended up tasting more like peach ice cream with a hint of vanilla.

1 large or 1 1/2 medium ripe peaches, white or yellow, pitted (about 6 ounces)

1/3 cup granola

2/3 cup almond milk

1/8 teaspoon almond extract

1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract (to taste)

2 teaspoons rose geranium syrup

A few drops of fresh lemon juice (to taste)

3 ice cubes

1. Place all of the ingredients in the blender. Blend until frothy, about one minute.

Yield: One serving.

Nutritional information per serving: 251 calories; 0 grams saturated fat; 1 gram polyunsaturated fat; 2 grams monounsaturated fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol; 51 grams carbohydrates; 5 grams dietary fiber; 174 milligrams sodium; 5 grams protein

Martha Rose Shulman is the author of “The Very Best of Recipes for Health.”

source:  blueridgenow.com

Previous post:

Next post: